Home » Uncategorized » Living Together, Voting Together: Cohabitation Causes Concordance in Turnout Behavior, and Increases Turnout

Living Together, Voting Together: Cohabitation Causes Concordance in Turnout Behavior, and Increases Turnout

Scholars have long noted that couples are more likely to vote and that partners’ turnout behavior is strongly correlated, but so far, little causal evidence has explained why. Utilizing a large Danish administrative data set with detailed information about the timing of individuals moving in together, we tease out whether these correlations are causal effects of interpersonal influence or stem from other factors. To identify the causal effect, we argue that couples moving in together right before an election are comparable to households moving together right after the election. We find strong evidence for a substantial causal effect of interpersonal influence: Concordance increases by twelve to seventeen percentage points while turnout increases by four to nine percentage points as an effect of cohabitation. The results highlight the importance of social norms and how the household as a proximate social network plays an essential role in explaining couples’ turnout behavior.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: